Does IT Matter?

A book that will change the way you think about technology and business strategy, Does IT Matter? Information Technology and the Corrosion of Competitive Advantage expands and extends the arguments in Nicholas Carr’s explosive Harvard Business Review article “IT Doesn’t Matter.” Does IT Matter? explains how technological, economic, and competitive forces are combining to transform the role information technology plays in business, with profound implications for IT management and investment as well as strategy and organization.

imagesDrawing on rich historical and contemporary examples, Carr’s seminal book lays bare the romantic myths that have come to surround computer hardware, software, and networks, and it provides practical advice for how companies can capitalize on the commoditization of IT.

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Reviews:

“Nicholas Carr has foisted an existentialist debate on the mighty information-technology industry . . . His argument is simple, powerful and yet also subtle.” –The Economist

“Carr lays out the simple truths of the economics of information technology in a lucid way, with cogent examples and clear analysis.” –Hal Varian, New York Times

“Carr [has] performed a service in puncturing some of the starry-eyed and self-serving cant of industry insiders. ” –Steven Levy, Newsweek

Does IT Matter? engages the imagination and the emotions, a rare combination in a business book.” –Boston Globe

“Coolly written [and] intellectually engaging.” –John Gapper, Financial Times

“Hugely enjoyable.” –Financial Review

Does IT Matter? will give executives and managers a way to sift through the next wave of tech hype.” –Rob Hof, Business Week

“Carr is . . . singlehandedly reshaping the way the business world thinks about information technology. “ –Chicago Sun-Times

“An important, thought-provoking reconsideration of the role of IT in the economy and within companies.” –Steve Lohr, Strategy & Business

“Widely challenged when they appeared, Mr. Carr’s arguments now fairly accurately describe today’s tech landscape, where corporate computing is widely viewed as a commodity or a utility.” –Wall Street Journal

“IT thinking rarely gets a contribution of this caliber. Read it.” –eWeek